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Female flowers of C.ruderalis

Female flowers of C.ruderalis

Last week I had been suffering from a mild allergy for almost 12 hours – symptoms included running nose, sneezing and mild headache. Took half a spoon of home grown powdered cannabis (shade dried and ground in a mixer); boiled it at a low summer in a cup of water and half a teaspoon of milk cream plus some honey. Strained it and drank it hot. The allergy disappeared within an hour !!

I used the same variety/strain of C. ruderalis as mentioned in my previous post. Meanwhile I came across the following reference about the antiphlegmatic effect of Cannabis in the paper: ‘The Religious and Medicinal Uses of Cannabis in China, India and Tibet’ by  MIA TOUW. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs. Vol. 13(1) Jan-Mar, 1981:

Cannabis increases the “gastric fire” (i.e., digestion and,
therefore, appetite), the “generative fire,” and it is
mentioned in one of the earliest medical works, the Sushruta
Samhita (of uncertain date with estimates ranging from 400
B.C.-600 A.D.), as an antiphlegmatic . Taken in
its literal current sense of mucus, this classification is quite
correct for cannabis acts both as an expectorant and
suppresses the production of mucus.

This fact finds support in the Tibetan medicine also:

The next most commonly mentioned medical use of
cannabis in Tibet is for suppurative diseases, especially
suppuration in the ears. The Tibetans consider the latter
condition to arise from “overmuch fluid in the head,”
which cannabis is held to remedy (Kirilov 1893). Since
they see it as an antiphlegmatic, they also employ it
against colds (Shah & Joshi 1971; Jain & Trafader 1970)
and rheumatism (Aldrich 1977; Sharma 1977a). Cannabis
is respected as an antihelmintic (Snyder 1971).

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